1. sparrowsace:

I have a lot of headcanons for this cute little baby groot.
This thing is gonna grow up listening to fantastic music and just be super groovy and chill and quirky. And it looks like a girl, doesn’t it look like a girl? Like I cannot wait to see this new member of the group in action. A rebellious teenage bandit tree chick who was raised by three tough badass dads (and one badass ninja mom) and rhythm in her veins. And just because she can only say three words doesn’t mean she can’t sing out a melody like nobody’s business.
And I just…
  

Yesssssssss.

    sparrowsace:

    I have a lot of headcanons for this cute little baby groot.

    This thing is gonna grow up listening to fantastic music and just be super groovy and chill and quirky. And it looks like a girl, doesn’t it look like a girl? Like I cannot wait to see this new member of the group in action. A rebellious teenage bandit tree chick who was raised by three tough badass dads (and one badass ninja mom) and rhythm in her veins. And just because she can only say three words doesn’t mean she can’t sing out a melody like nobody’s business.

    And I just…

      

    Yesssssssss.

  2. disappointedfeminists:

    So, first Science Magazine publishes this magazine cover. Women in science complain that it’s objectifying and not really appropriate for a field that still has some slight problems with women.

    And then it’s pointed out that it’s okay because it’s not objectifying ciswomen, it’s done to troll cismen with transwomen’s bodies

    That goes over exactly as well as you think it would

    And then it all becomes very boring.

    image

  3. whenyouworkatamuseum:

    image

    But really, why are you in a science museum if you hate science so much? 

  4. fandomfairy:

    madameatomicbomb:

    aggressivebutterfly:

    #and then she killed him  #the end  (via peggyleads)

    (via kaikamahine)

    Attention all men who won’t take no for answer: Pepper Potts is out there. Waiting. Watching. And she will kill you.

    And if she doesn’t, there’s always her best friends: Natasha “I can kill a man with my thighs” Romanoff, Maria “I kind of hoped you weren’t the duplicitous lowlife you turned out to be” Hill, and Melinda “You were never on top” May. 

    And this is why Marvel women are the best.

    (Source: pepperrppotts, via wolvensnothere)

  5. emmylovestrees:

    fairytalesandfallenangels:

    thesoil:

    Holy shit

    I can’t even begin to describe the brilliance of this segment. 

    Bravo.

    Bra-vo. 

    i’m screaming. she’s fucking awesome. anyone know where this can be found as an actual video?

    (Source: bostonreview, via jaythenerdkid)

  6. nimloth87:

…I’m not cool enough to draw Kate Bishop. I can’t even wear sunglasses without looking ridiculous, attempting to draw Kate Bishop was probably too ambitious. Fun, but too ambitious, I should probably stick to talking sausages. Or to talking with sausages. °__°(These brushes make everything 300% cooler. But even they are no match for Kate Bishop.) 

I need this hanging on my wall. Right about now.

    nimloth87:

    …I’m not cool enough to draw Kate Bishop. I can’t even wear sunglasses without looking ridiculous, attempting to draw Kate Bishop was probably too ambitious. Fun, but too ambitious, I should probably stick to talking sausages. Or to talking with sausages. °__°

    (These brushes make everything 300% cooler. But even they are no match for Kate Bishop.) 

    I need this hanging on my wall. Right about now.

    (via fuckyeahhawkguy)

  7. „When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.“

    Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

    (via racebending)

  8. ➞ cmbr: Don't Be Too Eager to Equate Past and Future Climate Change

    clnschltz:

    Tens of millions of years ago Antarctica was a lush green landscape. Then, it started to freeze. A sinking atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide probably had something to do with the southern continent icing over, so obviously some people think that global warming will bring us back to this…

  9. femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

    femmerenaissance:

    Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


    When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

    Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

    Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

     Sources:

    1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

    2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

    (via holistictumblragency)

  10. ➞ Gradient Lair: Conversations About Beauty and Beauty Privilege Need To Be Intersectional

    gradientlair:

    In my essay The Beauty Binary, Street Harassment and Rape Culture, I wrote about how the perception of beauty in regards to street harassment operates on a sliding scale (though usually a rigid binary) where whether or not a woman is perceived as “beautiful” or perceived as “ugly,” men will…