1. „When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.“

    Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

    (via racebending)

  2. ➞ cmbr: Don't Be Too Eager to Equate Past and Future Climate Change

    clnschltz:

    Tens of millions of years ago Antarctica was a lush green landscape. Then, it started to freeze. A sinking atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide probably had something to do with the southern continent icing over, so obviously some people think that global warming will bring us back to this…

  3. femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

    femmerenaissance:

    Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


    When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

    Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

    Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

     Sources:

    1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

    2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

    (via holistictumblragency)

  4. ➞ Gradient Lair: Conversations About Beauty and Beauty Privilege Need To Be Intersectional

    gradientlair:

    In my essay The Beauty Binary, Street Harassment and Rape Culture, I wrote about how the perception of beauty in regards to street harassment operates on a sliding scale (though usually a rigid binary) where whether or not a woman is perceived as “beautiful” or perceived as “ugly,” men will…

  5. rufflesnotdiets:

    Guo Pei

    God I love her work, and how she uses elements of historical Chinese fashion and art to create these amazing, sculptural pieces

    These designs are AMAZING. I’m surprised I had never come across her before!

    (Source: circumlocutionist, via beyondvictoriana)

  6. Love the combination of velvet and open linen. What an amazing dress.

    charlestonmuseum:

    image

    This tan open-weave linen dress, c. 1884, has a corseted bodice trimmed with maroon velvet and metallic beading; the brown faille skirt is draped with matching linen forming a bustle in back and apron drapery in front. It was worn by Susan Wright (c. 1859-1937) of Georgia who married DeForest Allgood in 1884. The dressmaker’s label inside is from Mrs. E. Donigan / 109 W. 12th St., N.Y. It was given to the Museum by Miss J. H. Wilson in 1975.

    Susan was the daughter of wealthy slave broker William Wright of Savannah who married Susan Bogardus in 1845. Susan’s grandfather, Henry S. Bogardus was a cabinetmaker in Savannah who was born in New York.

    After a brief disappearance around 1880, the bustle reappeared with astonishing proportions. Producing almost a shelf in back, the skirt was also ornamented with abundant drapery, often asymmetrical. And, while the earlier inner ties and skirt construction that forced tiny, mincing steps disappeared by the mid-1880s, the fabrics, trims and bustles were often so heavy that they hampered mobility. This dress is amazing, with its rich colors and elaborate beading. It was likely quite a fashionable autumn walking or visiting garment.

    INFORMATION REQUEST: Are you familiar with Mrs. E. Donigan? If so, we would love to learn more about this designer. Please share!

    Come visit this dress in person! It is currently on exhibit in our Seasonal Fashion: Autumn in Charleston.

    TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

  7. odditiesoflife:

    The Bestiarium of Aloys Zötl (1831-1887)

    These beautiful watercolours come from the Austrian painter Aloys Zötl’s Bestiarium, a series of exquisite paintings of various animals undertaken from 1831 through until his death in 1887. He was relatively unknown until, decades after his death, his work was “re-discovered” by surrealist André Breton who was taken by the surrealist aesthetic he saw present in the images – as he writes: “Lacking any biographical details about the artist, one can only indulge one’s fantasies in imagining the reasons which might have induced this workman from Upper Austria, a dyer by profession, to undertake so zealously between 1832 and 1887 the elaboration of the most sumptuous bestiary ever seen.”

    (via scientificillustration)

  8. revkin:

Fondly recalling short riffs I wrote on some of Bill Atkinson’s  amazing closeups of minerals for his book “Within the Stone” (which  could be a great iPad offering):
Read More

    revkin:

    Fondly recalling short riffs I wrote on some of Bill Atkinson’s amazing closeups of minerals for his book “Within the Stone” (which could be a great iPad offering):

    Read More

  9. comicallyvintage:

You’re Lovely…. But Evil!

    comicallyvintage:

    You’re Lovely…. But Evil!

  10. ➞ Chiangland: Don't give a damn 'bout my bad reputation

    cliffchiang:

    Inspired by a late-night viewing of The Runaways, and partly an exercise to see if I could make star-spangled pants and Wonder Woman go together. The idea started with Wonder Woman (I briefly entertained using an Ian Curtis Batman) but the idea of an all-girl rock band with Black Canary,…

    (via twentypercentcooler)